Dinosaurs and Super Girls

Less of the dinosaurs, more of the supergirls. I have a lot of feelings about comics, ponies, and books. I should draw more dinosaurs, though.
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Posts tagged "briget has opinions about comics"

mojo120:

kurozu501:

mojo120:

Whenever I see this page I am just like, WHY IS THIS NOT A BOOK. THIS SHOULD BE AN ACTUAL JL LINEUP. GO GO LEGACY CHARACTER BRIGADE. 

GOD YES just look at all these wonderful grown up kids

…wait Batman is female. is thAT CASSANDRA CAIN AS BATMAN!!???

Yup, that is indeed Cass Cain. And again this is a really awesome lineup.

(I exploded in tags and realized I might as well actually add it here.)

Images like this that make me really sad.

Because LEGACIES.

The whole point of a legacy is to carry on the spirit of the original, in a new way. So that you still have Batman and Superman and Wonder Woman, but through another’s eyes. Someone who wants to live up to a certain expectation and reputation, but also wants to redefine that expectation and persona, making each incarnation a unique and interesting individual — Robins and Batgirls being probably the best examples.

I love Bruce and Clark and Diana. But man, what I wouldn’t give to see some more stories exploring Cass and Damian, Kon and Kara, and Cassie as adults, entering the roles of their mentors.

(via kattybats)

ununnilium:

restlessimaginaut:

brikit:

ununnilium:

Ununnilium’s Land Of Mystical Wonders: I’m watching Batman: The Brave and the Bold…

restlessimaginaut:

brikit:

…And it’s just kind of infuriating me that DC editorial’s justification for their mess of a “reboot” (because come on this was really about the wish fulfillment of a bunch of 45-year-old men’s inner 10-year-olds) is that the DC universe was too confusing and had too many characters,…

Ununnilium and I have discussed this, and I wanted to throw it out there because I think that your theory about the reboot is part of a bigger story. This is a little complicated, and it involves starting with Watchmen (doesn’t everything?) …

I completely agree. There are a lot of things that were going on that brought the reboot to fruition.

My point about “inner ten-year-old wish fulfillment” has a lot more to do with the characters chosen to hit the spotlight than the actual plots — like bringing Barry back as the “iconic” Flash, even though Wally held the title for over 20 years, There Is Only One Batgirl and Her Name Is Barbara but There Are Still Four Robins, etc.

It’s funny with DC and Marvel, because I find that as comic companies, they originally came from very different places in terms of the stories they were telling.

For me, it boils down to these two points:

  1. DC is larger than life/optimism
  2. Marvel is human conflict/pessimism

And I know that that is a lot of watering down a lot of different points and characters and decades of things that have happened.

Even if you take Batman, who has ridiculously dark origins and fights in the night — he’s still a very larger-than-life character who builds his name on being a borderline urban legend, and then goes out of his way in his personal life to try to help all of these children who need the kind of direction and looking after he was forced to find for himself (Robins and Batgirls — especially taking Cass and Steph on board there).

The founding family of Marvel (as it exists today), on the other hand, is the Fantastic Four — an actual family unit, who have actual problems. And that was so new and crazy in the 1960s and people ate it up, setting the stage for more characters like that, more outcasts (X-Men), more complex family situations (Spider-Man), more arrogant snobs (Tony Stark). They fight crime, yes, but they also fight each other a lot of the time, even if it’s not in a physical sense all the time.

Because Timely/Marvel Comics spent a lot of time and effort going to the trouble of creating flawed characters, instead of adding flaws as they went, Marvel, to me, kind of has a more naturally pessimistic vibe than DC.

And that is also fine, because those are stories that deserve to be told. I don’t mind a little angst in my comics. What I do mind, and don’t understand, is why both major companies have come to the conclusion that the only good story is a grimdark story.

But that’s what we’re left with. Nearly all characters with a sense of humor and a bounce in their step have been sidelined, and the characters we’re left with have had their personalities rewritten so severely that in some cases, they’re barely even a shell of who they used to be. And that’s a damn shame :/

Well, that’s the funny thing about Marvel, right?

They’re coming out of the grimdark era or at least exploring it in interesting ways.

For the coming-out part, you have books like Captain Marvel and (I think it is) Uncanny X-Men. In the former case, you have someone who has accepted the full mantle of her father figure and is doing her best to live up to his reputation. Meanwhile, in Uncanny X-Men, the X-Men from the past have been brought to present, necessarily injecting their optimism into the current setting.

On the exploring side of things, you have Superior Spider-Man. Superior Spider-Man takes the “hero as morally ambiguous” to its fullest extent and, arguably, could be seen as a deconstruction of it. I say this because Otto crosses lines that heroes cross — and more besides — but he makes it wrong somehow.

I mean, they could still stand to lighten up some, but I think that they’re improving.

I think the main thing here is that the original thing Marvel did to differentiate themselves from DC was to focus on characters’ inner lives. And in the ’60s, that was necessarily a bit more pessimistic, since it meant that - gasp! - they weren’t perfect. Nowadays, though, it’s almost the opposite - characters are assumed to be fucked-up, and delving into their inner lives means getting into their surprisingly positive and happy and loving aspects.

Yeah, we’ve kind of gotten a swap of style from the two companies, but that’s not really a good thing. I love that Marvel is exploring their characters more fully and making them real, whole people, but I’m not really a fan of DC’s new phase of thinking that all people want to read about is conflict. Because it isn’t. :/

I’m really wondering when DC will realize that grimdark and “sexy” =/= good storytelling again. Because I can’t wait to read those stories.

lionesskate:

Ununnilium’s Land Of Mystical Wonders: I’m watching Batman: The Brave and the Bold…

brikit:

…And it’s just kind of infuriating me that DC editorial’s justification for their mess of a “reboot” (because come on this was really about the wish fulfillment of a bunch of 45-year-old men’s inner 10-year-olds) is that the DC universe was too confusing and had too many characters,…

I’ve said it before I’ll say it again. I don’t think a reboot was necessarily a bad idea and part of why I enjoy spin-off media like Brave and the Bold is that it allows people to enjoy a lot of these characters without the continuity baggage you can get from the comics.

However, they made a huge mess of it. The stuff I enjoyed with Batman in particular happened in-spite of the reboot not because of it. The fact we’re still missing Stephanie Brown and Cassandra Cain in the new timeline annoys me greatly.

Also someone recently asked me what the deal was with Jaina Hudson/White Rabbit, I looked at him straight and said “I’m not even sure the writers know what her deal is”

It’s funny, because in spite of all my anger about the reboot, I agree with you. If they hadn’t half-assed it and cobbled together a mess of a continuity of old and new instead of just full on mostly-starting over, I’d have been a lot more interested in reading the stories they were telling.

For instance, if they’d taken the Bat family back to Square 3, and had Jason as Robin, Dick as Nightwing, and Babs as Batgirl, I’d have been okay with that. (Because Nightwing is fun more than anything else.)

Instead new readers and old are left not-really-sure what the hell is going on. But unfortunately we’re left with…this and it’s just a mess. :/

ununnilium:

Ununnilium’s Land Of Mystical Wonders: I’m watching Batman: The Brave and the Bold…

restlessimaginaut:

brikit:

…And it’s just kind of infuriating me that DC editorial’s justification for their mess of a “reboot” (because come on this was really about the wish fulfillment of a bunch of 45-year-old men’s inner 10-year-olds) is that the DC universe was too confusing and had too many characters,…

Ununnilium and I have discussed this, and I wanted to throw it out there because I think that your theory about the reboot is part of a bigger story. This is a little complicated, and it involves starting with Watchmen (doesn’t everything?).

Watchmen — released in 1986-87 — was about many things, all of which it was intensely unkind to. Whether interventionism, superheroism, or geopolitics, everything was savaged. This produced a dark, grim tone and two characters which are important for this discussion: The Comedian and Rorschach. Later, when writers in the late 80’s and early 90’s were looking at Watchmen, they latched onto the grim tone and intense amorality (Comedian) and hyper violence (both characters) from Watchmen instead of anything more meaningful. This gave us the so-called “90’s Antihero” who had no morals and murdered his/her enemies, and he/she moved across a stage of violence, corruption, and general cartoonish grimness. And all of that came from misunderstanding what made Watchmen meaningful.

Now, fast forward 10 years. Kingdom Come arrives and posits a story where there are no “villains” per se. You’ll notice that Luthor has a very minor role in the story, and the Joker is purely a background element used to set up Kal’s/Superman’s disappearance from the public eye. Instead, the conflict is set up between the heroes: between Batman’s group on one side, Superman’s group on the other, and the “90’s antiheroes” caught in between the two. The story, like Watchmen, was about many things: moral standards, learning to change, the dangers of excess, the meaninglessness of violence, and so forth. It did, however, feature flawed, morally gray heroes who fought with one another.

Now, interestingly, comic writers apparently learned absolutely nothing from the Dark Age of comics, as they looked to Kingdom Come for inspiration … and grasped its surface elements only. You’ll notice that Marvel’s Civil War was released 10 years afterward and completely missed all the major points of Kingdom Come but grasped the outward trappings of hero vs. hero. Many of the lead-up events — Avengers Disassembled, the Execute Program arc of Iron Man — were about heroes performing in the roles of antagonists. DC was doing this too, to certain extents, such as with Identity Crisis — the heroes fighting with one another — and Infinite Crisis — former heroes being the antagonists.

Now, then, DC has learned nothing from Marvel’s experimenting with things like Dark Reign and Superior Spider-Man and went full on into the shallow imitation of Kingdom Come with flawed heroes and hero vs. hero conflict.

In sum total, then, I would say that the DC reboot isn’t only about the wish fulfillment of inner 10 year olds but just as much about a shallow imitation of Kingdom Come that’s been going on for 17 years.

I completely agree. There are a lot of things that were going on that brought the reboot to fruition.

My point about “inner ten-year-old wish fulfillment” has a lot more to do with the characters chosen to hit the spotlight than the actual plots — like bringing Barry back as the “iconic” Flash, even though Wally held the title for over 20 years, There Is Only One Batgirl and Her Name Is Barbara but There Are Still Four Robins, etc.

It’s funny with DC and Marvel, because I find that as comic companies, they originally came from very different places in terms of the stories they were telling.

For me, it boils down to these two points:

  1. DC is larger than life/optimism
  2. Marvel is human conflict/pessimism

And I know that that is a lot of watering down a lot of different points and characters and decades of things that have happened.

Even if you take Batman, who has ridiculously dark origins and fights in the night — he’s still a very larger-than-life character who builds his name on being a borderline urban legend, and then goes out of his way in his personal life to try to help all of these children who need the kind of direction and looking after he was forced to find for himself (Robins and Batgirls — especially taking Cass and Steph on board there).

The founding family of Marvel (as it exists today), on the other hand, is the Fantastic Four — an actual family unit, who have actual problems. And that was so new and crazy in the 1960s and people ate it up, setting the stage for more characters like that, more outcasts (X-Men), more complex family situations (Spider-Man), more arrogant snobs (Tony Stark). They fight crime, yes, but they also fight each other a lot of the time, even if it’s not in a physical sense all the time.

Because Timely/Marvel Comics spent a lot of time and effort going to the trouble of creating flawed characters, instead of adding flaws as they went, Marvel, to me, kind of has a more naturally pessimistic vibe than DC.

And that is also fine, because those are stories that deserve to be told. I don’t mind a little angst in my comics. What I do mind, and don’t understand, is why both major companies have come to the conclusion that the only good story is a grimdark story.

But that’s what we’re left with. Nearly all characters with a sense of humor and a bounce in their step have been sidelined, and the characters we’re left with have had their personalities rewritten so severely that in some cases, they’re barely even a shell of who they used to be. And that’s a damn shame :/

Because this is America, Me-from-the-Past. Home to Hollywood and Gatsby and Honey Boo Boo — we are literally in the myth making business.

John Green, Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

This. This is what I love and hate about America. Mostly love. And for me this line feels particularly poignant, because this just immediately struck a chord with me because America being in the myth making business is entirely why superhero comics exist and why comics in general were such an American phenomenon.

We make myths. We make heroes. We make villains. We don’t always do it right (and I’ll venture that we often do it wrong), but when I look at it from the perspective of superhero comics in general, I think we do it right.

sonotthatcool:

brikit:

Did they just make a group list of all the ones they could think of?

Characters I cannot even fathom why they are even in the running (Super DC bias because I just don’t know Marvel):

  • Big Barda
  • Sailor Moon
  • Zatanna
  • Power Girl
  • Lady Blackhawk
  • Vixen
  • Starfire
  • She-Hulk
  • Wasp
  • Spiderwoman

So I’m working on a thing about female superheroes and I was wondering what your beef is with batwoman, and sailor moon for that matter. I don’t know much about batwoman at all so I want to make sure I don’t include her if there’s a big controversy about her being a kickass woman.
As for sailor moon, I am a huge fan and if your only reference is the American show it can be very misleading to her kickass-ness.

I think you’ve misread my original post.

It took me a second to even realize which post this was before I clicked through, because it’s over a year old. This whole post was concerning the fantastically craptacular “Worst Female Superhero” contest that College Humor was trying to run (and eventually took down because the internet got really angry about it), and my two cents about how mad it made me.

I have no issues at all with any of these lady heroes, and I find most of them really amazing characters. My initial list was more about the characters I was most surprised to see in the runnings for “Worst Female Superhero”. There’s a lot of sarcasm in my original post, and it’s difficult to understand out of the context of last year’s College Humor contest.

You should totally include Batwoman on your thing as a kickass lady hero, though! She’s a fairly new character, and it’s really easy to catch up on her biggest appearances and stories. She first appeared in 52, and had her big debut in Detective Comics in an arc called Batwoman: Elegy. Her appearance in the New 52 picks up as if the reboot never happened, and is also really excellent.

As for Sailor Moon — I love her to death. You should check out my Sailor Moon tag, it is full of Sailor Moon love and drawings that I’ve done, haha.

(via so-not-that-cool)

gailsimone:

I’m curious about something.

How many of you came to the DC or Marvel universes initially through either the films, or animated series?

Did you fall in love with superheroes through comics, or was your first real exposure to them from other media?

And finally, specifically, does your love for a certain character or team stem in any way from film or animation, by which I mean, are you a Batman or X-men fan, for example, at least partially due to the films or cartoons?

This is for a reason…thanks!

A big reason why I am/was (it’s complicated) a fan of the DCU (…not really digging much of the DCnU) are the various animated series associated with them.

I was…seven? when B:TAS began, and that was a big part of my childhood, and The New Batman Adventures. S:TAS less so, but it was still there, and I really enjoyed Static Shock and Batman Beyond. Justice League/JLU completely blew me away even when they first aired in 2001 and I was only 14.

When I rewatched all of those shows in recent years, I have continued to be absolutely amazed by them.

But, aside from that, what bridged me into comics was the Teen Titans cartoon show. Especially when they started bringing in other teen DC heroes as cameos (Bumblebee, Speedy, etc). I got curious and looked up a lot of their backgrounds online, and then noticed two TPBs of Geoff Johns’ new Teen Titans series at the store and asked for them for Christmas. From there it was just a matter of asking our LCS guy for a running subscription and it was kind of slowly down the rabbit hole from there.

I’ve always been a much more periferal fan of the Marvel Universe. I really enjoyed X-Men Evolution, and I love almost all of the Marvel movies, but I haven’t read many of the MU comics. For no particular reason. I still enjoy the characters and appreciate what I know about them, but somehow I’ve just never bridged the gap into the canon material.

Your last question is tricky, because my favorite characters are ones that have never appeared on the big or little screen, like Stephanie Brown, Cassandra Cain, Daimian Wayne, or Tim Drake (not counting New Batman Tim, because he was secretly Jason Todd). Or I found them through comics way before their screen debut, like Conner Kent, Cassie Sandsmark, or Bart Allen. Or they’re characters whose comic book incarnations I find very difficult, but whose animated counterparts are completely excellent, like Bruce Wayne or Hal Jordan.

However, my fondness for Beast Boy, Raven, Starfire, and Cyborg almost certainly comes from the way they were portrayed in the show first (sorry Dick — you are actually way more loveable in comics than you are in that show).

I think I can say with some certainty that I probably wouldn’t be as into the idea of superheroes without the cartoon shows, though. I can’t say entirely because I come from a ridiculously nerdy family and I grew up around comic books.

gabzilla-z:

maeinli:

So I know this moment:

image

Is played for laughs and it really is hilarious XD I mean look at his face!

But I also find it remarkably sweet that Kilowog just completely forgot that Razer isn’t a Green Lantern.

Because, I mean, it wasn’t too many episodes ago where he wasn’t letting Razer forget.

image

It wasn’t so long in terms of episodes, but it’s been a pretty long time in terms of the show’s universe. The first half of the season took place over a pretty definite period of a little more than nine months.

This second half feels like it’s been even longer, just from a few little tells, mostly revealed in “Lost”:

The science director of the Guardians appears to have traveled with Zox from Oa, with no assistance from the Interceptor, meaning that it’s been at least 18 months since the mid-season finale.

We know that the Interceptor was definitely not involved in their transport because the science director was so surprised (and displeased) to see Aya still functional.

So far as we know, the Interceptor is still the only ship capable of making the trip to the Forgotten Sector in less than 18 months, and Sinestro seems to confirm this when he talks about the Interceptor being the Guardian’s most advanced prototype. It seems that without Aya’s advanced A.I., it’s impossible to control the ship effectively (See also: Lanos.)

In general, there’s been a lot more episodic exploration in this half of the season, and, much like the first season (see this semi-breakdown of the first nine months), there’s a lot of time that’s unaccounted for, and a lot of mini-adventures that could’ve happened in the interim, investigating Manhunter spottings, analyzing anti-matter waves, and what-have-you. Basically, all the space hopping their little hearts could desire.

On top of that, I am of the opinion that Zox was probably on Oa for a little while before they began the escort back to Ysmault, to work out the details of the peace treaty and the reparations owed by the Guardians.

TL;DR: It hasn’t been many episodes, but it’s been like, two years since Kilowog met Razer, and probably about a year and a half since he stopped giving him shit about being a Red Lantern, haha.

But aside from all that, it is kind of absolutely adorable that Kilowog half-forgot that a green energy source would be completely useless to Razer. HE’S PART OF THE TEAM.

(via kattybats)

keyofnik:

DIES

Two stories:

  1. When I was a junior in high school, we did these realistic drawings of gourds in colored pencil, and then had to take a copy of that drawing and insert it into an existing piece of art that we copied. I chose the bottom screen cap (or maybe the moment before it?) and it was hilarious, but now I’m not sure where it is and because it was rubber cemented on and this was 9 (ugh 9) years ago, the gourd has started peeling off anyway. (Boo.)
  2. It actually always really bugged me how absolutely useless Sailor Chibi-Moon was in the anime, especially in S. She was always the comic relief and the damsel in distress, and I thought that that wasn’t fair to her as a character, because in the manga she actually kicked some serious ass. It wasn’t her pure heart that made her such an attractive target to Pharoah 90 — it was her Silver Crystal and her obvious power that he could feed off of.

    I will admit that I…kind of trailed off with SuperS and still haven’t watched StarS, mostly because I got really annoyed with how much the stories deviated from the manga (I think that the original story of SuperS is probably the very best one of the entire series.)

    But since this set of screencaps is from S, my point still stands that it’s not fair that Chibi-Usa is so ridiculously underpowered in the anime. She may be a senshi in training, but she’s still the heir to the new Silver Millennium, and she still has a Silver Crystal. In a lot of ways, I feel like Chibi-Usa was more powerful in R than she was in S. And that’s a damn shame, and totally the opposite of how it should’ve been. :/

(via eternal-sailormoon)